Tag: presentation course

  • A Little Bit About London Presentation Course

    Some presentations fail to impress because key elements are missing. Much more fail because they contain too much information. Information overload is ever present in our modern society. The presentation which impresses with a powerful message is the one that is sharp and focused on its own aim. So, how to be sure that your presentation does not fall into the trap of providing your audience more information just because you can. What is it precisely that you want your audience to understand not just know at the end of your presentation? Can you explain this aim in one sentence? If you are able to write it down. If you can not then work at it until you can. If it won't fit into one paragraph that is sensible, then you have more than one aim and need more than one presentation. Keep this aim in mind. Build out in the aim, use mind-mapping or other planning aids if you are comfortable with them. Are you searching for presentation training? Browse the before outlined website.

    Immediately around the aim are clustered facts and figures that are essential. Further out there is supporting information that is important. As you get farther away from the relevance and the significance drops off sharply. Be ruthless and remove everything that doesn't build an image of your aim in the mind of your audience. Note down all of the information, illustrations and arguments; whatever you need. If you're not certain in the early phases if you will need a specific item, leave it in. But have the courage to throw it out later if it's not needed. One check question is, 'would my audience feel cheated if they found out about this later?' If so, leave it in. You are not hiding things from the audience; just doing them the courtesy of their having to listen to only what's needed. Do not fall into the trap of filling a thirty-minute slot just because you've been given that time. If you want less, say so. You will probably be thanked, especially if there is a busy programme. Needless to say, if you want more, ask.

    Never, ever, over-run your own time. Few of us are good enough speakers for our audiences to desire more than they asked for. Do you understand the difference between an example and an anecdote; humour and jokes; friendliness and obsequiousness? For our purposes, the distinction is what you leave in and what you discard. Do use examples if needed; do not ramble off into irrelevant tales. Do be somewhat humorous if appropriate; don't tell jokes, particularly smutty ones. Do be as friendly and open as the event allows; do not attempt to suck up to your audience. If you stick to these rules, your presentation will be sharp and lean. The lines you draw from the arguments to your conclusions will be clear. Your audience will understand exactly what you wanted them to understand with no distracting thoughts. Your chances of achieving your goal will be much higher. And if sometimes you do fail, at least you will know it was because you didn't convince them, not because you lost them on the way.

  • A Synopsis Of Presentation Skills Course London

    There are hundreds of different presentation training courses available, all of which promise to banish your nervousness and make you an accomplished public speaker. How do you choose the right course for you? Google "Presentation Training" will generate a very long list of different vendors who offer the same "Presentation Training". But as you look closer you will find some trainers approach the topic from a professional perspective, some from a business background, and a few from an educational viewpoint. While most courses cover the core elements of public speaking, they are all biased towards their area of specialty. Firstly, consider the type of presentation you are likely to be giving. Is it for a best man's speech, is it for business or is it about the technology of presentations. If it is for marketing or sales, you need to choose a business presentation training course. There are many aspects of giving a business presentation that may not be covered by a one-size-fits-all public speaking course. Does the course give you the opportunity to give at least two presentations? You need to practice and get feedback on your presentations if it is all talk from the lecturer you won't learn nearly as much.

    However, beware of courses that are almost all practical. You need to have some tutorial time to ensure that you are practicing the right skills. Anymore and you will spend too long listening to other people giving presentations. The larger the class the less opportunity there is for the lecturer to take on board individual concerns you might have or to focus on the particular type of presentation you are most likely to be giving. How long is the course? Most courses are either one or two days. If time and cost are not an issue, then a two-day course usually provides more time for practicing but can you afford to take two days away from your desk? A competent trainer should be able to cover all the main points about how to structure and give a presentation, plus allow enough time for practical’s on a one day course. Do they use video feedback? It is really useful to see and hear yourself giving a presentation. It is only with video feedback that you can appreciate what you look and sound like. How are the practical presentations reviewed? Is it just the lecturer's comments or are the other participants encouraged to comment on your presentation? Everyone is different and different people will pick up on different things, so a wider review panel is usually better. Are you hunting about presentation skills training london? View the before outlined website.

    The price of presentation skills training courses vary tremendously but in my experience price is not always representative of value. Just because a course is comparatively cheap, it does not mean it may be of lower quality than a far more expensive course. But do consider the average number of participants and the length of the course. Often cheaper courses have higher delegate numbers. Look for trainers who have been there and done it, not just the ones who talk about it. If you are looking for a business presentation training course look for one run by a business person, who has given lots of business presentations not an out of work actor, who knows about appearing on stage but little or nothing about business. Finally, check what you will get regarding course materials. If they are just providing you with a copy of the lecturer's slides than this is relatively useless as a source of additional learning. Look for courses which provide a source of ongoing reference material, checklists and the support to ensure you succeed in the future.